Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Disbudding

This is about the nastiest job there is when raising goats. But we believe it is necessary. We had a goat one year who caught her horn on a fence and when she pulled it out, she left her horn behind. It was a yucky mess. Now we disbud everyone.

Yesterday we disbudded Rosie (50% Saanen x 50% Nubian) along with her half brother and half sister who are both 100% Saanen. Rosie is about 2 weeks old, but since she is part Nubian her horns grow much slower than the Saanen horns.

The two Saanens were ready today! And they were only born last Thursday evening. They are only 5 days old and had buds as big as Rosie's!

Clover, Rosie's mom, wasn't too sure she wanted Rosie back after she smelled so horrible. We'll watch them and make sure that they stay bonded.

Janice was more than happy to take her two back and start licking off the Blue Coat spray that we use as an antiseptic.

We also did two little Saanens for a dear friend. It is a nasty job, and she doesn't like to do it either! She always does things for us when we can't. And I never feel bad helping her in any way I can.

Last year we had lots of problems with disbudding infections. I think it was because we didn't spray the sites with Blue Coat. I read somewhere that you didn't need to spray because the area was cauterized and didn't need disinfecting. This year we went back to using an antiseptic. I hope all goes well.

None of the kids we disbudded last year ended up with any scurs. I hope for the same this year.

1 comment:

Spinner said...

This is the worst part of raising goats but I am like you and think that it is necessary. We have a hard time selling kids that are not disbudded.

We always use the Blue Medicine and have never had an infection.